Frosch (Stuart)
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  • December 13, 2017
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The Little Mermaid

Say hello to Denmark's most famous lady, now 100 years old and still as popular as ever!

Your Denmark Travel Specialist

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Travel Information

Late August is a great time to visit for good weather and less crowds.

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Destination Overview

Venture out and holiday in Denmark's most beautiful and varied landscapes.

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City Guides

Must-try city breaks in Denmark!

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Things To Do

Activities

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Top Copenhagen Attractions
Wondering what to do in Copenhagen? Denmark's capital is packed full of great attractions, such as Tivoli and The Little Mermaid and it's easy to go between them on foot, by bike or on public transport.

Tivoli Gardens
Tivoli is a must for all children and those who like to play. Tivoli is located just a few minute walk from City Hall, and with the Copenhagen Central Station as its nearest neighbor it is very easy to get to.

Zoo
A visit to Copenhagen Zoo is always fascinating and with the opening of the Zoo's new and unique facilities for polar bears, North Atlantic birds and seals, The Arctic Ring, the visit just got a lot more interesting.

The Round Tower
The 17th century tower and observatory Rundetaarn, or the round tower, is the oldest functioning observatory in Europe.

The National Museum
Denmark's National Museum in Copenhagen has exhibitions from the Stone Age, the Viking Age, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Modern Danish History.

Experimentarium City
The Science Centre, Experimentarium City, in Christianshavn is Copenhagen's 3,000 m2 attraction where children and adults will be able to see, touch and experience science in all its forms.

The National Gallery of Denmark
The National Gallery of Denmark (Statens Museum for Kunst) is Denmark’s largest art museum, featuring outstanding collections of Danish and international art from the past seven centuries. Contemporary art exhibits are displayed in the X-Room. Exhibits range from installation art to photography and media art.

Open Air Museum
The Open Air Museum, Frilandsmuseet, is one of the oldest and biggest open air museums in the world. Spread across 86 acres of land, the museum houses more than 50 farms, mills and houses from the period 1650-1940.

Rosenborg Castle
Rosenborg Castle in Copenhagen is home to some of Denmark's greatest cultural treasures. The castle was built by Christian IV as a pleasure castle. In the basement you will find the Danish crown jewels and regalia.

Arts

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Copenhagen is a great city for art lovers. Copenhagen is home to internationally acknowledged art museums attracting artist from all over the world. Situated in scenic surroundings Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, a little North of Copenhagen, and ARKEN Museum of Modern Art, a little south of Copenhagen, are both havens for lovers of modern and contemporary art. Whereas The Danish National Gallery in central Copenhagen houses temporary exhibitions as well as three permanent collections of paintings and sculptures, graphic art and plaster casts. Below is the very best.

Top 9 Art Museums

ARKEN Museum of Modern Art
ARKEN Museum of Modern Art shows exhibitions with the greatest, Modernist artists alongside exhibitions of contemporary art - from new, young talents to household names.

Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art
Den Frie Udstillingsbygning is a must see in Copenhagen for anyone interested in art and architecture. The Independent is one of the oldest and most traditional exhibition spaces for contemporary art in Denmark and is in itself a unique and beautiful wooden building designed by the artist JF Willumsen. Den Frie has a special focus on contemporary artistic communities, collective exhibitions, artists' associations and experimental groups and networks.

The Hirschsprung Collection
Hirschsprung is an art museum in a class of its own located in Copenhagen. It stands as a unique presentation of Danish art from the 19th and early 20th centuries, spanning the period from the Danish Golden Age to the Skagen painters and the Modern Breakthrough.

Thorvaldsen's Museum
Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen (1770-1844) spent more than 40 years in Rome and was one of the most renowned artists among his contemporaries in Europe. In 1838, he donated his large art collection to his native city Copenhagen.

Kunsthal Charlottenborg
Kunsthal Charlottenborg is one of the largest spaces for contemporary art in Europe, presenting an ambitious program of exhibitions and events with a strong international focus.

Louisiana Museum of Modern Art
The beautiful museum, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, is located 40 kilometers north of Copenhagen and it has gained a reputation as a museum in touch with the zeitgeist of the contemporary art world.

The National Gallery of Denmark
The National Gallery of Denmark (Statens Museum for Kunst) is Denmark’s largest art museum, featuring outstanding collections of Danish and international art from the past seven centuries. Contemporary art exhibits are displayed in the X-Room. Exhibits range from installation art to photography and media art.

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek is an art museum founded in 1888 by the brewer Carl Jacobsen (1842-1914). The museum contains two main departments of ancient and modern art, offering a unique combination of art in impressive architectural surroundings.

Ordrupgaard
The Ordrupgaard Collections contain one of Northern Europe's finest collections of 19th and 20th century French art, represented by masters such as Delacroix, Corot, Courbet, Degas, Renoir, Monet, Cézanne, Gauguin, and Matisse.

Beaches

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Denmark’s Unbelievable Coastline

No matter where you are in Denmark, you’ll never be more than 50km from the sea. And with over 7,000km of coastline, it’s hardly surprising that beach-life is an important part of Danish culture and a popular holiday escape throughout the year.


Space for everyone
Summers can be lovely and hot in Denmark and with this much coastline around the mainland and many islands, there’s always room for everyone at the beach. No endless rows of sunbeds and rushing to find the best spot here. Days at the beach in Denmark are easy and relaxing, whether you want space to enjoy the beach with your children or find your own peaceful spot to lie back on.

Active adventures
For more active beach-lovers, there are plentiful activities on offer at various beaches around the country, such as fishing, kayaking, kitesurfing and windsurfing. At Klitmøller Bay in North Jutland, you’ll experience some of the best windsurfing conditions in Europe. Swimming in the sea is very popular in Denmark and with over 200 Blue Flag beaches around the coast, Denmark offers you some of the cleanest natural swimming areas in Europe.

All year round experiences
Most of Denmark’s coast is open to the public. Danish beaches are incredible on stormy, rainy or frosty days, when the bracing wind and salty sea air can really revitalize you. Take a walk along a Danish beach outside of the summer season and you never know what you’ll find – washed up amber, driftwood or fossils. Experiencing Denmark’s wild side is a real must.


North Sealand Sea and Beaches

The Kattegat Coast is dotted with many, mild-watered swimming beaches waiting for you to take a dip.


Historic holiday region
North Zealand's coast has always been an extremely popular holiday area. There are beaches all the way along the coast, but you’ll find the widest beaches in the cosy little towns of Hornbæk, Tisvildeleje and Liseleje. The sand here tends to be white and fine. Large sand dunes provide shelter from the wind, which blows more here than further south.

The Oresund Coast
The Oresund Coast to the south is calmer and the beaches are smaller. You can access great swimming via the little wooden bridges or piers that are built out into the water in the summer months. Typically Danish, you'll see Danes climbing off the ends for a dip regardless of the water temperature!

Fjord beaches
At Isefjord and Roskilde Fjord, you also find a number of nice, small beaches with shallow waters, particularly around Lynæs. The fjords are also dotted with picnic areas and are a wonderful alternative to the coast.

Culture

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Culture vultures will be well satisfied by Copenhagen’s many eye-opening offerings. The compact city is full of galleries, theatres, dance performances, film and live music venues. All are easily reached on foot, by bike or by public transport.

Theatres

From the impressive old Royal Danish Theatre on the King’s New Square (Kongens Nytorv) to the brand new Royal Danish Playhouse (Skuespilhuset) on the waterfront, Copenhagen is buzzing with Danish and international theatre.

Art
The city is packed with art galleries in classic settings as well as new up-and-coming venues. With world-class contemporary art galleries all over Copenhagen, the whole area is an art-lovers' paradise.

Live music
With everything from the dramatic new National Concert Hall to underground dance clubs, you’ll find your taste for live music satisfied in Copenhagen. The city is also home to the annual Copenhagen Jazz Festival.

Opera
The stunning Copenhagen Opera House (Operaen) is worth a visit in itself. Built in 2005 and designed by world-renowned architect, Henning Larsen, the building dominates the waterfront across from Amalienborg Palace. You can visit by boat, foot, bus or bike but remember to wear your finery for an evening performance!

Dance
There are many exciting dance venues and festivals in Copenhagen for you to enjoy. In particular, Dansehallerne; a cool centre near the old Carlsberg brewery, where you can catch the best international and Danish contemporary dancers. The Royal Danish Ballet is also an experience. If you are here in August, don’t miss the Royal Danish Ballet’s open-air performance at Copenhagen’s old fortress, Kastellet.

Cinemas
You can see new films and old classics at cinemas across the city. Copenhagen has a number of large multiplexes, as well as smaller, intimate cinemas that show art-house film. The city also hosts big film festivals, such as CPH: DOX, the documentary film festival in November, and CPH: PIX, the annual international film festival each April.

Events

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Copenhagen Jazz Festival
The capital of Denmark, Copenhagen, comes alive and vibrant with the Copenhagen Jazz Festival. Every year the festival starts the first Friday of July and continues for 10 days. The jazz festival is one of the biggest jazz festivals in Europe, and visitors can enjoy renowned and amateur jazz musicians in unique concert halls, clubs as well as in the streets and city squares.

Copenhagen Cooking
The Copenhagen Cooking food festival kicks off in August and runs through September 2. Visitors and locals alike indulge in gastronomic experiences throughout Copenhagen, and can take part in celebrating the Nordic Kitchen’s seasonal and sustainable principles. Get ready for urban dining adventures, Michelin dining, and Copenhagen Cooking's very own Nordic beer.

WonderCool
Can’t make it to the Copenhagen Cooking in August – don’t fret. The WonderCool Festival in February offers a range of adventurous events from fashion shows to music events and gastronomic experiences. Gastronomic safaris by boat to pop-up restaurants with focus on Nordic Cuisines are just some of the experiences to be had.

Christmas in Tivoli Gardens
Tivoli Gardens is one of the oldest amusement parks in the world filled with history, wild rides, gourmet food, concerts and much more. At Christmas time, Tivoli is transformed into a magical garden of sparkling lights, decorations, sweets and entertainment.

Explore The Outdoors

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If you love outdoor pursuits and you prefer something a bit different, there are plenty of unusual outdoor activities in Denmark, from porpoise watching to fossil hunting. Here are some suggestions for exhilarating outdoor activities in Denmark.

10 Exhilarating Outdoor Adventures

Stags in season

There’s nothing like experiencing the roaring and strutting of stags in season. Denmark has many places where you can get close to the action in late summer and autumn, as stags put on impressive displays to attract females and defend their territory. The rutting season lasts about a month. The deer in Denmark’s deer parks have become accustomed to a quiet human presence, so you really can witness this amazing annual ritual from up close. You can see red and roe deer at Haderslev Jægersborg Deer Park, 15km north of Copenhagen and you can also catch the action with deer at both Thy Oxbøl and Slotved Forest in Jutland.

The Black Sun
At Tøndermarsken in the Wadden Sea National Park, South Jutland, you can see the unbelievable natural phenomenon known as the Black Sun. Occurring in spring and autumn, the Black Sun occurs when thousands of starlings gather at dusk, drawing amazing dark patterns on the sky. This stunning sight draws thousands of onlookers each season and is well worth travelling to the park for. You should plan a few days out on the flat marshes to truly soak up the Black Sun. Though Tøndermarsken is the best place to witness this, you can also catch it around Ribe, Tipperne at Ringkøbing Fjord and on Rømø island.

Seal and porpoise watching
There are many seal colonies on rocks and small islands around the coast of Denmark, some of which you can visit by boat. You’ll see seals and porpoises popping up all around the Danish coastline. The most common seal in Denmark is the spotted seal, but if you’re lucky, you may spot the much rarer grey seal. Seals are inquisitive but shy animals. Sometimes access to seal colonies is restricted, such as at the Rødsand Seal Reserve on Falster island, the most important breeding ground for spotted seals in the whole Baltic Sea. The area is closed to visitors in the breeding season from March to the end of September. Denmark has sealariums in Esbjerg, Hirtshals, Kerteminde and Grenaa, where you can get really close to these elegant, underwater creatures. Porpoises are small whales with distinctive dorsal fins. You can often spot them in the waters of the Great and Little Belts, the Skagerrak, the Kattegat and the North Sea. On the island of Rømø, you can take a seal and porpoise safari.

Amber hunting
Some people have a real eye for amber, Nordic gold, which you can find all along Denmark’s coastline. Chances of finding these little gems hidden on the beach are best where it is most windy and where the surf is biggest, so the West Coast of Jutland and the Kattegat coast are particularly good. Amber is small lumps of ancient resin that wash up from the sea floor and can sometimes be as old as 50 million years. In some, ancient insects have been caught inside as it hardened. Amber has always been treasured and used for jewelry and ornaments. Amber can be tricky to spot because it is not only yellow in color, it can also be white, black or reddish and you can easily mistake it for stones.

Caving
If you are brave enough to head underground, Denmark has some incredible abandoned mine networks and natural caves which are open to the public. In many of these, you’ll have to share the eerie darkness with colonies of bats, sometimes numbering tens of thousands! Jutland has three well-known abandoned mines –Mønsted Limestone Quarries, Daugbjerg Limestone Mines andThingbæk Limestone Mines. All three are now open to the public with museums and subterranean adventures. Together, they offer hundreds of kilometres of underground world to explore and you can really get a sense of what life was like for the miners who used to work down there. The island of Bornholm is covered with open caverns known as Ovens. Some of them are only accessible by sightseeing boat, others you can reach on foot. You can find out more about how these dramatic formations were created at the Naturbornholm Centre in Aakirkeby.

Fossil hunting
If you’re lucky enough, you can find fossils all over Denmark. Fur island in Limfjord and the southern coast, particularly around the Møn and Stevn cliffs, are fantastic fossil areas. You can find prehistoric treasures scattered around, without needing any equipment. Typical fossils in Denmark include sea urchins, belemnite fossils and crab shells. You can keep the fossils you find, providing they aren’t extremely rare, in which case you’ll need to hand them over to the nearest geological museum for everyone to marvel at. You can find your nearest museum at the local tourist office. Experience the birth of Denmark at the exciting GeoCenter Møns Klint. Not only does the centre have fascinating exhibitions on the geological history of Denmark for you to enjoy, but they also organise fossil hunting and other outdoor expeditions into the local area.

GPS Treasure hunts
Geocaching is an outdoor, interactive treasure hunt where you use a GPS to search for a hidden treasure. Many people around the world take part in this sport and there are hundreds of treasures hidden around Denmark. Treasures tend to be small pots with a log book and small gifts in. If you succeed in finding the treasure, you can take some of the treasure and log your find in the log book.

Dinner in the forest
There are many areas across Denmark designated as places where you can set up campfires. National parks and public nature areas such as forests may even have covered areas with benches and other facilities. It’s important that you only use designated areas to cook your wild dinner in the forest, so check where you can find campfire areas with your local tourist office. Depending on the season, the Danish countryside is full of wild berries, nuts, mushrooms and other edible plants. You are welcome to gather these delicious wild treats in public areas. As a general rule, you should leave some for others, so try not to take more than a carrier bag’s worth from any one place.

Sleeping in the wild
If official campsites are not your thing and you crave the serenity of a night camping in the wild, Denmark is the country for you. With over 1,000 areas for wild camping, there are a multitude of natural camping experiences waiting for you. No caravans or motorized vehicles are allowed in these places. They are pure, unspoilt spots where you must leave nothing but your own footprints behind.
Wild camping sites are often equipped with running water and toilet and around a third have shelters you can sleep in. You may only sleep a maximum of two nights at each location. The Danish Nature Agency gives the following guidelines for wild camping. They also have a map of all wild camping spots in Denmark.This function is in Danish but if you click “Overnatning” on the left-hand menu, all the wild camping spots (primitive overnatningspladser) will be shown on the map of Denmark.

Mountain biking
There are eight special areas in Danish forests where you can let loose and mountain bike off the normal marked paths out into the forest.
They are:
- Bidstrup Forest in North Zealand (9.5km)
- Blåbjerg Klitplantage south of Ringkøbing Fjord (7.3km)
- Bordrup plantation at Båvands Huk (6.8 and 8km)
- Klosterheden northwest of Holstebro (50km)
- Hare woods northwest of Copenhagen (26km)
- Rold Skov in Jutland (23km)
- The forest just north of Copenhagen (10km)
- Aabenraa Forests in South Jutland (8.4km)
If you don’t have your own mountain bike with you, you can hire one in most bike shops in Denmark. You should expect to pay around 150 and 200kr for a day’s hire.

Family

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Denmark is a family vacation haven. It’s an incredibly safe and relaxed country and there’s never far to the next great experience, be it fun, challenging or full of things to learn. All across the country you’ll find a wide variety of family-friendly accommodation, accessible restaurants, efficient services and welcoming staff. From world-renowned attractions such as Tivoli and Legoland, to unique experiences, such as ghostly tours of castle dungeons or a week in a prairie wagon, Denmark has something for the whole family.

Museums and Science Centres through children’s eyes

Just visit one of Denmark’s national museums to see how the biggest Danish attractions are tailor-making experiences for children. Most of them have special areas for kids where they can get stuck in with drawing, painting, exploring exhibitions or be entertained by professional and knowledgeable staff. As well as these extra services, most museums give children under 15 years of age free admission. Denmark has a number of fascinating Science Centres where children and adults alike can get hands-on science experiences. With live demonstrations and the opportunity to try things for yourself, Science Centres combine learning with great fun for the whole family.

Playgrounds – free fun in the open air
Denmark is covered with well-equipped public playgrounds, ideal for a few hours of air and exercise as well as fun! These are great places to take your children to play with and get to know local Danish children and to meet their families or to just enjoy a few hours peace and quiet while your kids play. Public playgrounds dot Denmark’s towns, cities and parks but you can also find wild playgrounds in state forests. Drop into your local tourist office to ask about the nearest forest playground.

Getting around with children is easy
Distances between experiences in Denmark are short and it’s easy to get public transport, organise car hire and access sites. This means that it’s possible to terrify your children with a tour of the dungeons of Kronborg Castle in the morning, sail in a Viking ship on Roskilde Fjord in the afternoon and finish with an exhilarating evening in Tivoli Gardens in the evening. There are fantastic attractions and outdoor adventures all across the country, so a holiday on Funen or in the north of Jutland is as easy as a break in the capital. Even Denmark’s bridges are amazing, so a car journey can be broken up with the thrill of driving over Europe’s longest suspension bridge, The Great Belt Bridge. It’s even easy to bring the very young to Denmark, as many attractions, restaurants, hotels, major stores and regional trains offer you quiet spots, changing rooms and child seats.

Kids on Public Transport
You can enjoy big discounts for your children on public transport in Denmark. On Denmark’s national train network, a paying adult can bring up to two children under 12 years old with them for free. The same applies on Copenhagen’s S-trains, buses and metro. Children under 16 years of age, travelling alone on public transport, pay half the adult price. On most ferries, children between the ages of 0 and 3 years old travel free, while those over 3 pay half price. Ask at the information desk before buying your ticket for more info.

Restaurants and Cafes with Kids
Danes are informal and relaxed and children are normally welcomed everywhere, including places that serve alcohol, during the daytime. It’s not uncommon to see pushchairs left outside cafes and restaurants with sleeping children inside. This is a safe and common practice in Denmark and Danes are happy to let their little ones sleep in peace outside whilst keeping a close eye on them from inside. Breastfeeding is also acceptable in public places. Danish restaurants are normally equipped with high-chairs for children, so just ask for one when you enter. Many also offer special children’s meals or allow you to order a smaller portion at a reduced price for your little ones.

Free Accommodation for Children
You may be surprised to hear that many hotels in Denmark offer free accommodation for children under 12 years old, when they sleep in their parents’ bed. Check with your hotel at time of booking to find out about discounts, rules and pricing.


Copenhagen for Kids

Copenhagen is a great city to explore with children. It’s not too big, it’s relaxed and many attractions and services offer that little bit extra for kids. Here are some tips and inspiration to help you plan a family break to the fun-filled Danish capital.

Get To Know the City

If this is your first time to Copenhagen, a bus tour is a great way to get to know its streets and sights and kids love seeing the city from the top of a big double-decker. Or why not head down to the canal for a boat tour of the inner city, its canals and harbor?

Create Your Own Copenhagen tour
It’s also possible to create your own sightseeing tour which fits your family by combining a 24-hour public transport ticket, valid on bus, train and metro throughout the city, with a harbor ferry ticket. Remember too that a paying adult can take two children under 12 years of age with them for free.

The Changing of the Guards
Children never forget witnessing the changing of the guards, an impressive display of control and precision taking place everyday at 12 noon outside the Queen’s residence, Amalienborg Palace.

Parliament Tour Take a tour through Christiansborg Palace, next to today’s parliament, and walk through hundreds of years of Danish history depicted on beautiful tapestries and paintings in the Royal Reception Rooms.

Fairytale Jewels
Head with your family to Rosenborg Castle, in the stunning King’s Garden, for a real-life treasure hunt. Tucked away inside the castle are the Crown Jewels, the dream of any little prince or princess!

Bird's-Eye Views
If you can convince your little ones to climb the dizzy heights ofThe Round Tower in the city centre, the views over the city’s old town are well worth the trek. Alternatively, a walk up the outside of the twisted dragon spire of Vor Frelsers Kirke (Our Saviour's Church) affords incredible views but is not for the faint-hearted!

The Old Town Centre
Copenhagen’s popular pedestrian streets are wonderfully atmospheric for a walk around and you will often be entertained by street performers and musicians. From the King's New Square (Kongens Nytorv) you can take a stroll down the colourful harbour street Nyhavn and jump onto a canal tour boat.

Tivoli
Tivoli is an unforgettable experience, regardless of your age. Within the boundaries of this world-famous city amusement park, you’ll find centuries of history, a unique atmosphere and thrilling fairground rides. Hans Christian Andersen once strolled in these gardens and today, you can enjoy concerts, performances, rides, restaurants and exhibitions all in one place. Tivoli is open throughout the summer months but it also opens for two extra special occasions, bringing Halloween and Christmas to life for a whole new generation of children.

Bakken
Just north of the city, is the famous Deer Park by Klampenborg Station. It's a wonderful place for a stroll, picnic or to see the park’s deer strutting their stuff or quietly grazing together. The Deer Park is also home to the world’s oldest amusement park,Bakken. The area also offers you the popular Bellevue Beach, so Bakken makes for a perfect day trip for the whole family.

A Day at the Zoo
Copenhagen Zoo is a great day out, situated at the edge of the beautiful Frederiksberg Gardens. The zoo is full of wild creatures, big and small, with a famous elephant house, a polar bear, tigers and much more. At the zoo’s children’s area, your kids can interact with tamer animals and learn about how to look after them.

Child-Friendly City Museums
Many of the city’s museums offer special exhibitions, activities and areas for children. In particular, the following have great provision for kids: the Post & Tele Museum, National Gallery of Denmark, the Tycho Brahe Planetarium, Denmark's Aquarium, The National Museum, Zoological Museum, The Workers’ Museum and the Experimentarium. Another great place to take your kids is theGuinness Museum of World Records.

Green Spaces
You can head to many parks in Copenhagen, green oases with space for relaxation and all sorts of things to distract your children. Most parks have playgrounds with the latest equipment and Fælledparken in Østerbro offers both a sensory garden and a skate park. The King’s Garden (Kongens Have) is a wonderful picnic spot and in the summer, your children can enjoy a free puppet show.Frederiksberg’s large formal gardens are a fantastic place to stroll, feed ducks and take a rowboat out on the water. You can even see the zoo and its inhabitants from parts of the park.

A Refreshing Dip
If you and your family are in need of a refreshing dip, there are bathing and paddling pools in a number of Copenhagen’s parks, including the intimate Shooting Range Gardens (Skydebanehaven) in Vesterbro and Nørrebro Park. For the more adventurous, the open harbour at Islands Brygge has a charming outdoor swimming area complete with a high diving platform. You can also swim in the harbour at Fisketorvet and at Svanemøllen harbour. If it’s sand you’re after,Amager Beach Park is only 5km from the centre of Copenhagen and offers you kilometres of white sandy beach and watersports.

Food

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Seasonal ingredients. Organic. Innovative. These are just some of the words describing the Copenhagen gastronomic scene today. Copenhagen is fast becoming one of the leading gastronomic destinations. Dig in! Read more about Eat your heart out!

Whether you are into bistros or Michelin-starred restaurants you will find it in Copenhagen. The restaurant scene is among the worlds most distinct and innovative, and it caters to all budgets. When dining out try the much appraised Nordic kitchen at least once. It is known for being of high quality and with a focus on using local and seasonal produce.

Are you an early riser or arriving in Copenhagen in the morning you need not despair! There are plenty of cafés serving an early breakfast. If you are on Vesterbro try café Bang & Jensen or the trendy Dyrehaven which will get your day started with a hearty breakfast.

Had one too many cocktails last night? Or just in need of a proper meal before the day’s sightseeing? Either way you can start the day properly at the many cafés in Copenhagen serving a hearty brunch. Count on scrambled eggs, fresh fruits and pancakes to be among the ingredients.

A truly unique Danish food experience, you can get at lunch time in Copenhagen, when the unique smørrebrød (literally spread bread, or open faced sandwich), is served. Invariably based on rye bread, smørrebrød can have an almost limitless number of different toppings, from herring, to raw beef, seafood and egg.

Copenhagen is a green city and that also reflects in the restaurants. Many of the Copenhagen restaurants go for an organic or largely organic menu. Whether you are into Italian, Nordic or a Danish hot dog you have the option of treating yourself with an organic option.

The restaurants in Copenhagen have a habit of taking a well-deserved day off on Sundays. Therefore, it is a good idea to check if the restaurant of your choice is open Sunday night, before you head down there with an empty stomach.

Perhaps your flight got in after regular restaurant opening hours, or maybe you just want a midnight snack that is not room service, or undesirable fast food. Do not despair, if you are hungry at night, there are some great options in the city.

Monuments

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Copenhagen is full of statues, sculptures and monuments. Some of them are hidden in museums and galleries. Some you might not even notice unless you look for them. Others are right there in the street for you to walk by. Except you should stop, spend a couple of minutes to discover the fine work of the sculptor and the historic significance of them. Here are some of the best sculptures, monuments, museums and statue parks in and around Copenhagen.

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek is an art museum founded in 1888 by the brewer Carl Jacobsen (1842-1914). The museum contains two main departments of ancient and modern art, offering a unique combination of art in impressive architectural surroundings.

Monument for Denmark's International Effort Since 1948
The Monument for Denmark’s International Effort Since 1948 by artist Finn Reinbothe was erected by the Danish people and inaugurated on Flag Day 5 September 2011.

Zinkglobal
The 3 meter tall and 2,5 ton heavy metal sculpture is placed on Nordre Toldbod by Langelinie and has caused quite the stir Copenhagen.

Ryvangen Memorial Park
Ryvangen Memorial Park (Mindelunden) inHellerup on the outskirts of Copenhagen is a beautiful park commemorating the Danish freedom fighters who were executed here or elsewhere, or died in German concentration camps, during World War II.

The Genetically Modified Little Mermaid
On a new square by one of the old warehouses in the Copenhagen Harbour, 'Dahlerups Pakhus', the Danish professor Bjørn Nørgaard has created a sculpture group called 'The Genetically Modified Paradise'.

The Royal Cast Collection
The Royal Cast Collection. More than 4000 years of the history through 2000 plaster casts of the most exquisite masterpieces of Western culture.

Gefion Fountain
The Gefion Fountain is a large fountain on the harbour front. It features a large-scale group of animal figures being driven by the legendary Norse goddess, Gefjun.

Thorvaldsen's Museum
Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen (1770-1844) spent more than 40 years in Rome and was one of the most renowned artists among his contemporaries in Europe. In 1838, he donated his large art collection to his native city Copenhagen.

Nordmandsdalen
As a part of the castle grounds of Fredensborg Palace, located north of Copenhagen, Nordmandsdalen sculpture park displays baroque statues commissioned by the king in the 1700s.

Ogier the Dane at the casemates
In the casemates of the Kronborg Castle in Elsinore, the Danish legend Ogier the Dane sleeps in the form of statue.

Museums

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History Museums

Copenhagen oozes of history with its cobblestone narrow streets, old timbered houses, ancient castles and palaces. Explore the history of Copenhagen’s defence in green surroundings at Copenhagen's Fortifications, which were built to defend the city. Experience Denmark's 1,000-year history - from the Viking Age 800 to 1066 and the time of Bishop Absalon (1167) to 20th century Depression and World War II history - in the city's museums.

Museum of Copenhagen

Only 700 meters from the Visitors Centre you find Museum of Copenhagen, housed in one of the beautiful mansions from the 1700's.

The National Museum
Denmark's National Museum in Copenhagen has exhibitions from the Stone Age, the Viking Age, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Modern Danish History.

Open Air Museum
The Open Air Museum north of Copenhagen is one of the largest and oldest in the world. Spread across 86 acres of land, the museum houses more than 50 farms, mills and houses from the period 1650-1940.

Brede Works
Brede Værk used to be an old clothing factory, today it is a museum. Here you can see the evolvement of the industrialisation - and its influence on everyday life in Denmark.

Post and Tele Museum
At the House of Communication, Post & Tele Museum, in Copenhagen city centre, you can explore how people communicated in the olden, pre-computer days and how modern communication technology has evolved. The museum also contains a huge collection of Danish stamps issued between 1851 and 1998.

The Royal Arsenal Museum
The Royal Danish Arsenal Museum boasts an excellent selection of antique and modern weapons, ranging from beautifully ornamented princely weapons and war trophy firearms to state-of-the-art handguns.

The Royal Danish Naval Museum
The Royal Danish Naval Museum shows the historic naval model collection, naval artillery, ship decoration, marine paintings, nautical instruments, uniforms, submarine interiors and a children's museum. If you are into naval ships and sea battles, the Royal Danish Naval Museum is guaranteed to thrill you.

The Theatre Museum
The Theatre Museum is situated in the Old Court Theatre. Its collection describes Danish theatre history from the 1700s to the present day.

The Museum of National History
The National Historic Museum at Frederiksborg Castle, also called the Frederiksborg Museum is a cultural history museum based in Frederiksborg Castle in Hillerød. Museum offers a chronological collection including portraits, historical paintings, furniture, art industry, highlighting the history of Denmark from Christianity's introduction to today.


Top 10 Art Museums

Copenhagen is a great city for art lovers. Copenhagen is home to internationally acknowledged art museums attracting artist from all over the world. Situated in scenic surroundings Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, a little North of Copenhagen, and ARKEN Museum of Modern Art, a little south of Copenhagen, are both havens for lovers of modern and contemporary art. Whereas The Danish National Gallery in central Copenhagen houses temporary exhibitions as well as three permanent collections of paintings and sculptures, graphic art and plaster casts.

ARKEN Museum of Modern Art

ARKEN Museum of Modern Art shows exhibitions with the greatest, Modernist artists alongside exhibitions of contemporary art - from new, young talents to household names. With a Copenhagen Card you will get free entrance at ARKEN.

Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art
Den Frie is the artists' house and show exhibitions produced, initiated or selected by the artists.

The Hirschsprung Collection
Hirschsprung is an art museum in a class of its own located in Copenhagen. It stands as a unique presentation of Danish art from the 19th and early 20th centuries, spanning the period from the Danish Golden Age to the Skagen painters and the Modern Breakthrough.

Thorvaldsen's Museum
Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen (1770-1844) spent more than 40 years in Rome and was one of the most renowned artists among his contemporaries in Europe. In 1838, he donated his large art collection to his native city Copenhagen.

Kunsthal Charlottenborg
Kunsthal Charlottenborg is one of the largest spaces for contemporary art in Europe, presenting an ambitious programme of exhibitions and events with a strong international focus.

Louisiana Museum of Modern Art
The beautiful museum, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, is located 40 kilometers north of Copenhagen and it has gained a reputation as a museum in touch with the zeitgeist of the contemporary art world.

The National Gallery of Denmark
The National Gallery of Denmark (Statens Museum for Kunst) is Denmark’s largest art museum, featuring outstanding collections of Danish and international art from the past seven centuries. Contemporary art exhibits are displayed in the X-Room. Exhibits range from installation art to photography and media art.

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek is an art museum founded in 1888 by the brewer Carl Jacobsen (1842-1914). The museum contains two main departments of ancient and modern art, offering a unique combination of art in impressive architectural surroundings.

Ordrupgaard
The Ordrupgaard Collections contain one of Northern Europe's finest collections of 19th and 20th century French art, represented by masters such as Delacroix, Corot, Courbet, Degas, Renoir, Monet, Cézanne, Gauguin, and Matisse.

National Parks

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Denmark offers you three stunning natural areas designated as national parks, where you can experience a range of exciting activities or simply escape into nature.

Nature Awaits, All Day Every Day

Denmark has three national parks, where you can venture out into some of the country’s most beautiful and unique landscape. Danish national parks are open all day, every day, and are free to access. You can explore the parks on foot, by bike, on horseback or by car. Check the signs when you enter to find details and regulations.

Park Activities
Denmark’s national parks are unspoilt natural playgrounds where you can try everything from picnics, wild camping and campfires, to cycling, bird watching and horse riding. Each park has a visitor center with ideas for how to get the most out of your visit and with details on park guides and trails.

Thy National Park
Denmark’s biggest and oldest national park lies on the North West Coast of Jutland and covers over 200km².

Mols Bjerge National Park
The Mols Bjerge National Park, in East Jutland, is one of the most rugged and varied landscapes in Denmark, with many rare animal and plant species.

Wadden Sea National Park
The Wadden Sea, in West Jutland, is a wetlands national park that extends south all the way into Germany and Holland. These parts of the area are now on the UNESCO World Heritage List for their ecological importance.

Places

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Copenhagen City Areas
Get to know one of the world's coziest capital cities, where all the top sights and attractions are within walking or biking distance from each other! Explore parts of the city less travelled by visitors, such as the calm and chic Frederiksberg and architectural Amager and take in sights such as Hans Christian Andersen's grave in Nørrebro or The Little Mermaid on her rock near Østerbro.

Frederiksberg

Classic Frederiksberg is a pocket of calm and chic close to the city centre. Take a coffee to go and stroll in the grand royal park, Frederiksberg Have. From Copenhagen Central Station, it’s easy to walk into Frederiksberg along Gammel Kongevej; a fantastic shopping street with grand old buildings and trendy cafés and restaurants.

Vesterbro
Copenhagen’s edgiest quarter is now the hippest place to be in Copenhagen. Sample Vesterbro's ecclectic shops, diverse restaurants and funky bars. Formerly the Red Light District, up-and-coming Vesterbro boast its own Meatpacking District, with gritty bars and fine dining side-by-side.

City Centre
Copenhagen’s unmissable bits in one beautiful and manageable knot of streets and alleys. Enjoy royal palaces, Tivoli and world-class shopping, as well as top sights such as colourful Nyhavn and The Little Mermaid. Copenhagen’s most-famous sights are all within walking or cycling distance in the historical city centre.

Nørrebro
Copenhagen’s multi-cultural heart is packed with things to do, day and night. Walk to Hans Christian Andersen's grave in tranquil Assistens Cemetery. Some of Copenhagen’s coolest streets are to be found in Nørrebro, a short walk past the Lakes from Nørreport station.

Østerbro
Østerbro is a laid-back and trendy area, dotted with green spaces and great shopping. Say hello to The Little Mermaid on her rock in the sea nearby! Home to Copenhagen’s largest park, Fælledparken, and the national stadium, Østerbro still manages to ooze a cosy, neighbourhood feel.

Amager
Explore the beaches and harbours of this lesser-known gem and a green oasis in the city. Everything from outdoor swimming to opera! Take your own architectural tour of Ørestad; one of Copenhagen’s newest areas and a hub of inspirational buildings, such as the Mountain Dwellings, Number 8 building and Bella Sky.

Restaurants

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The New Nordic kitchen has gained international appeal around the world and today the kitchen is highly praised internationally. The New Nordic kitchen is characterized by its uniquely Nordic identity among the world’s greatest cuisines and by its commitment to organic, sustainable and local products.

Top 10 New Nordic Kitchens

Restaurant BROR

Samuel Nutter and Victor Wågman have previously worked the pots and pans at the world-renowned Michelin-star restaurant Noma in Copenhagen. Now they have opened restaurant Brother in the heart of the Danish capital. The two chefs are inspired by Nordic cuisine, and their restaurant can accommodate 46 guests. It's possible to order à la carte or try their tasting menu.

Kadeau
Originally there was only one restaurant Kadeau in Denmark, and that was situated on the island Bornholm. But in the 2011 the people behind Kadeau decided that it was time to share the Bornholm delights with Copenhagen. Ever since they have served high class gastronomy in the restaurant in Christianshavn. Here the menu is inspired by Bornholm specialties and Danish ingredients. On the menu you will find dishes such as Danish octopus and oysters, porks belly and beetroot, and for dessert Sloan and whey.

Manfreds og Vin
Manfreds og Vin is located on the hip street,Jægersborggade in Nørrebro. It is the team behind Relæ just across, which is behind this cozy little restaurant. Manfreds og Vin focuses on everyday food, which is aided by modern techniques and raw materials of the highest quality.The raw materials are biodynamic vegetables from Kiselgården, roots from Lammefjord, pig from Grambogaard, lamb from Havervadgaard and herbs from the forest. At Manfreds og Vin, the wine is natural wine, which has made the restaurant to Copenhagen's first natural wine bar.

Alberto K
Alberto K on top of Radisson Blu Royal Hotel in Copenhagen has been rated among Denmark's best restaurants by both national and international newspapers and magazines. Nature is the source of inspiration. Alberto K uses Danish ingredients from small local farms and the food is prepared on the basis of availability at precisely the time of year you choose to visit. Alberto K's goal is that a course must reveal its ingredients in a new way, and without excessive manipulation. The taste must be clear and light, and it must leave a simple impression.

Noma
The gourmet restaurant noma has been ranked the Best Restaurant in the World in 2010, 2011 and 2012 by Fine Dining Lovers. In 2014 it was yet again ranked the best in the world and kept its two stars in the Michelin Guide 2014. Chef Rene Redzepi excels in Scandinavian cuisine. Superb produce is brought in from Iceland, the Faeroe Islands, Greenland, and, of course, Denmark. Redzepi has worked at famous El Bulli in Catalonia, so it comes as no surprise that the food here is exceptionally good. Located in a renovated harbour-front warehouse in Christianshavn, noma's setting is an extra appeal.

Pony
One of the most succesful gourmet restaurants in Copenhagen, Kadeau, has now welcomed their baby brother Pony. The renowned Copenhagen restaurant Kadeau on Vesterbro is moving to bigger premises on Christianshavn. However, they are keeping their restaurant on Vesterbrogade and renamed it Pony.

Radio
Entrepreneurial Claus Meyer has along with two other chefs opened Restaurant Radio in Copenhagen, close to the Lakes and the beautiful old Broadcasting House. Here you can get organic and Nordic food. Restaurant Radio gets their vegetables from a two hectares of land located outside Copenhagen. For twenty years, the fields have been cultivated organic. It is the more than 80 different crops that makes up the restaurant's vegetables.

Relæ
The restaurant, Relæ, located in the Nørrebro area of Copenhagen, prides itself on delivering a, no nonsense gastronomic experience. Relæ has one Michelin star and was ranked number 56 on the the 2013 list of the World's Best Restaurants. Relæ offers a creative kitchen free from the cultural heritage pushed upon the traditional Michelin-star driven restaurant, without being labeled as one of the usual, fine-dining, brasserie, or bistro restaurants.

Restaurant AOC
AOC holds one star in the Michelin guide, and is the former Premisse, located in central Copenhagen.Their aim is to give you the ultimate sensory experience, through stimulating as many senses as possible – sight, smell, sound and taste. The cuisine is based on Nordic produce, and the focus of the chef is on the pure taste. The restaurant offers four to seven course set menus. It is also possible to experience what they term, a Sensory evening, where everything is included into a 7 or 10 course menu.

Marv & Ben
The Bib Gourmand restaurant Marv & Ben (Marrow & Bone) is located in the beautiful medieval cobblestone street of Snaregade. At Marv & Ben focus is on modern Danish cuisine and fresh local ingredients from the restaurant's own garden at Hanebjerggård in Nordsjælland. This is innovative regional cooking that will delight your taste buds! Do not expect complicated haute-cuisine for the selected few. Here, the main concern is unfussy and intensely flavourful food.

Höst
Cofoco has opened another restaurant in Copenhagen. This time it is Höst which is serving Nordic food. Höst is the ninth i the row, and the restaurant is located in rooms distributed on ground floor and basement floor in the neighborhood of Nansensgade, close to the Lakes.

Restaurant Geranium
Geranium is one of Copenhagen's two two-star Michelin restaurants. It was also ranked the 42nd Best Restaurant in the World in 2014 by Fine Dining Lovers, and is run by the world's best chef in 2011 Rasmus Kofoed. Geranium is a lucid, light, and dynamic kitchen. The mission is to create meals that involve all the senses – restores, challenges, and enriches.

Restaurant Julian
Restaurant Julian at the National Museum in inner Copenhagen offers a wide choice of Danish and international dishes inspired by ongoing exhibitions and activities at the museum. Restaurant Julian is open for brunch and lunch as well as coffee and cakes.

The Standard
Claus Meyer from noma, Meyers Madhus and jazz musician Niels Lan Doky have joined forces to open a combined restaurant and jazz club. Here you can enjoy Nordic as well as Indian food while listening to soothing jazz tones. The former Custom House will house no less than three restaurant, two bars and a jazz club. Combined they make The Standard.

Shopping

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Copenhagen’s Top Shopping Districts

Come and shop in Copenhagen! You’ll find clusters of trade and shops dotted around the city, which makes looking for something in particular even easier and brings you to some of Copenhagen’s most interesting parts.

Great materials. Functional. With an edge. Danish fashion is cool, wearable and fast becoming internationally known. Not only are Danish fashion designers earning international recognition, Copenhagen is also home to Scandinavia’s largest Fashion Week. In fact, since the sixties, Danish fashion has developed into one of the most successful Danish export industries.

Bredgade

This grand street runs past the royal palace of Amalienborgand contains the city’s finest antique art and furniture dealers. Pick up classics from Arne Jacobsen, Finn Juhl and many others here.

Kongens Nytorv
The area in and around Kongens Nytorv (The King’s New Square) buzzes with cutting-edge Danish fashion brands and interior design shops. You’ll find Bang and Olufsen’s flagship store here. Please note that a new metro line is currently being built here, so it is not possible to access the square itself at present.

Læderstræde
A charming and quieter alternative to Strøget runs one street behind it and contains unique jewellery, clothing and interior boutiques, as well as lovely cafés to take a break in.

Jægersborggade
One of Copenhagen's coolest streets right now sits at the edge of Assisten's Churchyard where Hans Christian Andersen is buried. Full of cafés, second-hand and other curiosity shops.

The Latin Quarter
On the other side of Copenhagen University, the area on and around Larsbjørnsstræde is a hub for avant-garde, underground and up-and-coming labels.

Kronprinsensgade
A stroll around this street and its surrounds will take you past the windows of some of Denmark’s biggest new names in fashion, such as Marlene Birger.

Strøget
Copenhagen's main shopping street is the longest pedestrian street in the world. It's also the place to pick up big brands, both Danish and international, and to visit well-known department stores such as Illum and Magasin.

Fiolstræde
The streets around Copenhagen University are the place to head for new and antique bookshops or to sit in a café and relax with a good read.

Østerbro
This district next to the lakes has some lovely small boutiques, exclusive to Copenhagen, as well as the up-and-coming Danish design powerhouse, Normann.

Frederiksberg
A cozy area with many small boutiques. Head to this district to grab a bargain on Royal Copenhagen Porcelain at the Royal Copenhagen factory outlet shop located in the old factory from the late 1800s.

Vesterbro
This area, previously a little rough around the edges, is now the trendiest part of the city. Head to Istegade and its side streets for small, edgy boutiques.

The Airport
If you didn’t have a chance to grab what you wanted in the city, Copenhagen Airport has an excellent selection of Copenhagen’s biggest brands, so you can pick up what you need before you board.

Flea Markets
There are several flea markets around Copenhagen. If you are looking to make a good deal, you should pay a visit to one of the flea markets, but make sure to arrive early!

Sports

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The Danes like sports – as participants, spectators and in front of the television. Almost two million actively participate in sports as members of an association. Almost two thirds of all children and young people are engaged in organized sports in their leisure time.

A Nation that Plays the Ball

Unknown in many parts of the world, but ubiquitous in Denmark. During the winter season, the Danish national sport is handball.

Danish Football - The National Sport of Denmark
Football is the national sport of Denmark and the most popular sport played here. Currently there are nearly 300,000 players and 1,614 clubs registered with the Danish Football Association.

Denmark and the Olympic Games
Denmark has participated in every Olympic Games of the modern era except one and considering the size of the country's population, Denmark has historically done very well in the Olympic Games.

Elite Sports
Elite sports are handled by the sports federations under DIF in close collaboration with Team Danmark, which was established by law in 1984. It was created in response to a wish that Danish athletes should have better opportunities to compete on equal terms with those of other countries, who were increasingly receiving public subsidy.

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