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Fun, Adventure, History & Culture

Whether it is a lavish dinner in the peerless desert of Wadi Rum, a barbecue at the shores of the Dead Sea , or a reception atop a medieval castle overlooking the Jordan Valley, the amicable and competent people of Jordan will ensure a once in a lifetime memorable experience.

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Travel Information

Everything you need to know as you prepare for your trip to Jordan!

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Destination Overview

Experience this historic country that has become a must-see for people from all over the world.

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City Guides

Learn more about the Kingdom of Jordan!

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Things To Do

Activities

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Outdoor 'adventure tourism' is expanding at a fast rate in Jordan, and promises to remain one of the most dynamic and innovative travel industry sectors for years to come. Several Jordanian companies have started to specialize in eco-tourism and action tourism, providing the combination of safety, adventure, and comfortable facilities that make action tourism such an exciting proposition today.

Jordan has a great comparative advantage in this sector, based on several assets: Moderate year round climate; a base of powerful, unique cultural attractions such as Petra, Jerash, Bethany Beyond the Jordan, and the early Islamic Desert Castles; and, a wide range of very different, often stunning natural environments that are easily accessible and virtually undiscovered by the tourism industry. Quality hotels and restaurants throughout the country mean that thrill-seekers who want to pamper themselves in between adventure treks have a wide range of facilities to choose from.

Jordan already caters to the more traditional vacationer who likes to combine a visit to an ancient site in the morning with a swim, a round of golf, or a game of tennis or bowling in the afternoon. The exciting new horizons in adventure tourism allow visitors to push themselves to new levels of adventure and endurance while soaking up natural marvels and dramatic cultural attractions from the ancient world.

Nature enthusiasts have many options in Jordan: The vast, silent drama of Wadi Rum, the forested hills of central Jordan, or the plunging Jordan Rift Valley that includes the Dead Sea - the lowest spot on earth at 410m below sea level. The Red Sea resort of Aqaba is always warm, balmy, and enticing for divers and other watersports enthusiasts. Aqaba offers a full range of facilities for speedboating, scuba diving, snorkelling, sailing, fishing, swimming, water skiing, wind surfing, or simply loafing and sunning in the warm crystal-clear waters of the Red Sea. The sparkling purple mountains surrounding Aqaba beckon hikers who seek new adventures, and unconquered terrain.

Jordan boasts other unique, enticing waters that provide relaxing interludes for adventure vacationers who want to rest their spirits and soak their bodies. Quality hotels and spas at the Dead Sea and the nearby Hammamat Zarqa / Ma'in Springs allow visitors to experience several different kinds of mineral hot springs and the thick, warm brine of the Dead Sea, which are both soothing and therapeutic. One of the great water adventures in Jordan is to hike, climb and sometimes even wade or swim through the magnificent gorge of Wadi Mujib, along the east coast of the Dead Sea, to reach a magical pool and waterfall that emerge like a mirage from amidst the surrounding warm cliffs and barren hillsides.

The more daring adventure visitor to Jordan is likely to climb mountains in Wadi Rum to conquer sheer granite cliffs that retain the inscriptions of local climbers who were there 5,000 years ago and more.

Thrill-seekers who want to go beyond the ordinary will get into a helicopter or hot air balloon and rise to mountain-tops in Wadi Rum or around Petra, from where they can trek back down to earth. Gliding and private plane rentals are also available in Jordan, only from Marka Airport in Amman.

Horseback riders can take a few days to retrace the segments of the ancient Spice, Silk, and Frankincense Routes that pass through the green hills of Petra, Amman, and north Jordan. More daring riders will want to mount their Arabian steeds for a four-day trek through the Eastern Desert, stopping for rest and water at several early Islamic desert castles and caravan stations. This trip re-enacts the original Arabian pony express mail service that operated there in the 7th century.

Arts

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Art Galleries in Jordan

Jordan has a rapidly developing fine arts scene, including an increasing number of female artists. Today, artists from various Arab countries find freedom and inspiration in Jordan. The Jordan National Gallery of Fine Arts, for example, boasts a fine collection of paintings, sculptures and ceramics by contemporary Jordanian and Arab artists. The Jordan Association of Artists can help in organizing studio and gallery tours of Amman.

Cultural Centers

Jordan hosts a number of centers devoted to local arts and culture, such as the Royal Cultural Centre - a modern complex housing theatres, cinemas, and conference / exhibition halls. A monthly program is available on request and local English-Language newspapers carry details of upcoming events.

Theatres & Cinemas

Foreign language films are shown with the original soundtrack and Arabic subtitles. Times are listed daily in The Jordan Times, the daily newspaper.

Handicrafts

A visit to Jordan is certainly incomplete without an introduction to its rich legacy of ancient handicrafts. Traditional handicrafts in Jordan have been passed down over many generations, from a time when all Jordanians met their domestic needs by weaving their own rugs and making their own earthenware vessels and utensils. An impressive cultural mélange of Arab and Islamic imagery is reflected in Jordanian crafts, which include beautiful handmade glass, handy earthenware vessels, skillful basket and carpet weaving, and exquisite embroidery. Crafts produced on a smaller scale include artistically decorated sand bottles, finely chiseled sculptures, and uniquely crafted silver jewelry. During the past century or so, Jordanian crafts have benefited from the skills and influences of other diverse cultural traditions.

Beaches

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Greatly prized as Jordan's window to the sea, Aqaba brings a refreshing release from the rose-colored desert to the north. Its sandy beaches and coral reefs are the most pristine on the Red Sea, and Jordanians hope to preserve them through careful planning. With several first-rate hotels, restaurants and shops, Aqaba caters to a tourist crowd that is tranquil and relaxed, seeking its pleasures more by day than by night.

Indigo-colored deep water lies just off shore in Aqaba, bringing kaleidoscopic marine life within easy reach. Exploring means a leisurely drive to a private spot and a short swim out to the reef. Unusual vertical currents and sea breezes make diving cool and pleasant, even in the heat of the summer.

Although Aqaba is famous for its water sports and adventure activities, there are a host of leisurely activities that can be enjoyed by visitors who wish to relax, rejuvenate or just get away from the pressures of city life. For those who prefer their marine life at arm's length, glass-bottomed boats are a fun way to enjoy the marvels of the Red Sea.

Boat trips are a great way to spend a relaxing day, and there are many to choose from. Daily excursions tour Aqaba's coastline, stopping periodically to allow guests to take a dip in the warm waters or slip on a mask and snorkel to take in some of the colorful sea life. Overnight trips can also be arranged on board the larger sailing boats and include full-board accommodation and water sport activities.

Aqaba basks in balmy weather nine months of the year, in winter, spring and autumn. Summer is hot, but you can pace your activities and adapt to the climate, slowing down in midday, and reviving in the cool of the evening.

After a long day of relaxing on Aqaba's sandy shores, there is no better way to refresh than by visiting one of the luxurious spas found in many of Aqaba's leading hotels. The spas combine Eastern and Western techniques and offer luxurious body treatments, rejuvenating facials, cleansing scrubs and body wraps, using world-renowned Dead Sea products.

Culture

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Jordan can be regarded as a typical Arab country, for its people are very warm, friendly and hospitable. Jordanians are typically happy to forgive foreigners who break the rules of etiquette. However, visitors seen to be making an effort to observe local customs will undoubtedly win favor.

Joining local people for a cup of tea or coffee can be a wonderful way to learn more about local culture. If you are invited yet are unable to attend, then it is perfectly acceptable to decline. Place your right hand over your heart and politely make your excuses.

Many families, particularly in rural areas, are very traditional and, if you visit their house, you may well find it is divided between the men and women. Foreign women are often treated as "honorary" men.

Local women in Jordan enjoy considerable freedom when compared with many other countries in the region. Women are entitled to a full education, they can vote, they can drive cars, and they often play significant roles in business and politics. Arranged marriages and dowries are still common.

Museums

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Karak Castle is a dark maze of stone-vaulted halls and endless passageways. The best preserved are underground and can be reached via a massive door (ask at the ticket desk). More imposing than beautiful, the castle is nevertheless an impressive insight into the architectural military genius of the Crusaders.

The West Front Wall

With some care, you can walk along the crenellated top of the West Front wall and admire the sweeping view. On clear days, you can look across the Dead Sea and see all the way to the Mount of Olives bordering Jerusalem.

Away from the castle, visitors can visit the Castle Plaza, where beautiful 19th century Ottoman administrative buildings have been redesigned to house a tourist center, with restaurants, a crafts center and other facilities grouped around a central plaza.

The famous Arab traveller Ibn Battuta wrote in his travel report that, in 1326, Karak could only be entered through a tunnel hewn in rock. The entrances to two such tunnels (which are now blocked) are still visible – a large one next to the road approaching Karak from the southeast (Salah ad-Din Street) and a smaller one near Baybars’ Tower.

The two most impressive towers (‘burj’ in Arabic) of Karak are Burj Al-Banawi, a round tower bearing a monumental inscription adorned by two panthers, the emblem of Sultan Baybars; Burj As-Sa’ub, a small fortress in its own right; and Burj Az-Zahir Baybars (or Baybars' Tower), a massive structure resembling the castle keep.

Karak is still a largely Christian town, and many of today's Christian families trace their origins back to the Byzantines.

Showbak Castle

A lonely reminder of former Crusader glory is Showbak Castle, less than an hour north of Petra. Once called "Mont Real," Showbak dates from the same turbulent period as Karak. It is perched on the side of a mountain, with a grand sweep of fruit trees below. The castle's exterior is impressive, with a foreboding gate and encircling triple wall. Despite the precautions of its builder, the fortress fell to Saladin only 75 years after it was raised. Inscriptions by his proud successors appear on the castle wall.

Karak Archaeological Museum

The Karak Archaeological Museum was established inside the old castle, which has remains from the Moabite period in the first millennium BC, going through the Nabataean, Roman, Byzantine, Islamic and Crusader periods. The museum was opened in 1980.

The main part of the museum is a large hall in a vault of the castle, used as living quarters for soldiers in the Mameluk period. The collections date from the Neolithic up to the late Islamic periods and come from the Karak and Tafila regions. Among the sites is Bab Adh-Dhra’, famous for its Bronze Age burials. The museum houses remains of skeletons and pottery from the Bab Adh-Dhra' graves; Iron Age II artifacts from Buseirah; Byzantine glass vessels and inscriptions, and Roman and Nabataean artifacts from Rabbah and Qasr.

Mazar Islamic Museum

Located at Al-Mazar near Karak, the museum is host to a collection of items representing Islamic civilization and culture, including sculpture, ceramics and coins.

Places

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Amman

A sprawling city spread over 19 hills, or "jebels," Amman is the modern - as well as the ancient - capital of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. Known as Rabbath-Ammon during the Iron Age and later as Philadelphia, the ancient city that was once part of the Decapolis league, now boasts a population of around 2.3 million people. Amman, often referred to as the white city due to its low size canvas of stone houses, offers a variety of historical sites. There are a number of renovations and excavations taking place that have revealed remains from the Neolithic period, as well as from the Hellenestic and late Roman to Arab Islamic Ages. The site which is known as the Citadel includes many structures such as the Temple of Hercules, the Umayyad Palace and the Byzantine Church. At the foot of the Citadel lies the 6,000 seat Roman Theatre, which is a deep-sided bowl carved into the hill and is still being used for cultural events. Another newly restored theatre is the 500-seat Odeon that is used for concerts. The three museums found in the area offer a glimpse of history and culture; they are the Jordan Archaeological Museum, The Folklore Museum and the Museum of Popular Traditions.

Madaba

The trip south from Amman along the 5,000-year-old Kings' Highway is one of the most memorable journeys in the Holy Land, passing through a string of ancient sites. The first city to encounter is Madaba, “the City of Mosaics." The city, best known for its spectacular Byzantine and Umayyad mosaics, is home to the famous 6th century mosaic map of Jerusalem and the Holy Land. With two million pieces of colored stone, the map depicts hills and valleys, villages and towns as far as the Nile Delta. Other mosaic masterpieces found in the Church of the Virgin and the Apostles and the Archaeological Museum, depict a rampant profusion of flowers and plants, birds and fish, animals and exotic beasts, as well as scenes from mythology and everyday pursuits of hunting, fishing and farming. Literally, hundreds of other mosaics from the 5th through the 7th centuries are scattered throughout Madaba's churches and homes.

Petra

The ancient city of Petra is one of Jordan's national treasures and by far its best known tourist attraction. Located approximately three hours south of Amman, Petra is the legacy of the Nabataeans, an industrious Arab people who settled in southern Jordan more than 2,000 years ago. Admired then for its refined culture, massive architecture and ingenious complex of dams and water channels, Petra is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site that enchants visitors from all corners of the globe. Much of Petra's appeal comes from its spectacular setting deep inside a narrow desert gorge. The site is accessed by walking through a kilometer long chasm (or siq), the walls of which soar 200m upwards. Petra's most famous monument, the Treasury, appears dramatically at the end of the Siq. Used in the final sequence of the film "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade." the towering façade of the Treasury is only one of myriad archaeological wonders to be explored at Petra. Various walks and climbs reveal literally hundreds of buildings, tombs, baths, funerary halls, temples, arched gateways, colonnaded streets and haunting rock drawings - as well as a 3,000 seat open air theatre, a gigantic 1st century Monastery and a modern archeological museum, all of which can be explored at leisure. A modest shrine commemorating the death of Aaron, brother of Moses, was built in the 13th century by the Mamluk Sultan, high atop mount Aaron in the Sharah range.

Jerash

A close second to Petra on the list of favorite destinations in Jordan, the ancient city of Jerash boasts an unbroken chain of human occupation dating back more than 6,500 years. The city's golden age came under Roman rule and the site is now generally acknowledged to be one of the best-preserved Roman provincial towns in the world. Hidden for centuries in sand before being excavated and restored over the past 70 years, Jerash reveals a fine example of the grand, formal provincial Roman urbanism that is found throughout the Middle East, comprising paved and colonnaded streets, soaring hilltop temples, handsome theatres, spacious public squares and plazas, baths, fountains and city walls pierced by towers and gates. Beneath its external Graeco-Roman veneer, Jerash also preserves a subtle blend of east and west. Its architecture, religion and languages reflect a process by which two powerful cultures meshed and coexisted - The Graeco-Roman world of the Mediterranean basin and the ancient traditions of the Arab Orient.

Aqaba

Famed for its preserved coral reefs and unique sea life, this Red Sea port city was, in ancient times, the main port for shipments from the Red Sea to the Far East. The Mameluk Fort, one of the main historical landmarks of Aqaba, rebuilt by the Mameluks in the 16th century. Square in shape and flanked by semicircular towers, the fort is marked with various inscriptions marking the latter period of the Islamic dynasty. The current excavations at the ancient site of the early Islamic town Ayla, with its two main streets intersecting in the middle and dating back to the 7th century already revealed a gate and city wall along with towers, buildings and a mosque. The museum houses a collection of artifacts collected in the region, including pottery and coins. Aqaba also hosts the house of Sharif Hussein Bin Ali, the great grandfather of King Abdullah II. Other places of interest include the mud brick building thought to be the earliest church in the region.

Desert Castles

Jordan's desert castles, beautiful examples of both early Islamic art and architecture, stand testament to a fascinating era in the country's rich history. Their fine mosaics, frescoes, stone and stucco carvings and illustrations, inspired by the best in Persian and Graeco-Roman traditions, tell countless stories of the life as it was during the 8th century. Called castles because of their imposing stature, the desert complexes actually served various purposes as caravan stations, agriculture and trade centers, resort pavilions and outposts that helped distant rulers forge ties with local Bedouins. Several of these preserved compounds, all of which are clustered to the east and south of Amman, can be visited on one - or two-day loops from the city.

Quseir Amra, one of the best preserved monuments, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Its interior walls and ceilings are covered with lively frescoes, and two of the rooms are paved with colorful mosaics.

Crusader Castles

For those fascinated by the Crusader Legends and Lore, a second group of castles beckons. The scenic Kings' Highway is littered with the remains of Crusader forts and outposts. The most important among these are Karak and Showbak - fascinating examples of architectural and military traditions of the time. Their galleries, towers, chapels and ramparts still echo with the resolve of the Crusaders who built them almost a thousand years ago.

Ajlun

Ajlun Castle (also known as Qal'at [Castle] Ar-Rabad) was built in 1184 by 'Izz ad-Din Usama bin Munqidh, a general of Saladin, who defeated the Crusaders in 1187. A fine example of Islamic architecture, the fortress dominated a wide stretch of the northern Jordan Valley and passages to it. From its hilltop position, Ajlun Castle protected the communication routes between south Jordan and Syria, and was one of a chain of forts that lit beacons at night to pass signals from the Euphrates as far as Cairo. Today, Ajlun Castle is a splendid sight with a fascinating warren of towers, chambers, galleries and staircases to explore, while its hilltop position offers stunning views of the Jordan Valley.

Karak

The fort itself is a dark maze of stone-vaulted halls and endless passageways. The best-preserved are underground, and to be reached through a massive door (ask at the ticket office). The castle in itself is more imposing than beautiful, though it is all the more impressive as an example of the Crusaders' architectural military genius. Karak's most famous occupant was Reynald de Chatillon, whose reputation for treachery, betrayal and brutality is unsurpassed. When Baldwin II died, his son, a 13-year-old leper, sued for peace with Saladin. The Leper King, however, died without an heir, and in stepped Reynald, who succeeded in winning the hand of Stephanie, the wealthy widow of Karak's assassinated regent. He promptly broke the truce with Saladin, who returned with a huge army, ready for war. Reynald and King Guy of Jerusalem led the Crusader forces and suffered a massive defeat. Reynald was taken prisoner and beheaded by Saladin himself, marking the beginning of the decline in Crusader fortunes. The castle was enlarged with a new west wing added by the Ayyubids and Mameluks.

Showbak

A lonely reminder of former Crusader glory is Showbak Castle, less than an hour north of Petra. Once called "Mont Real," Showbak dates from the same turbulent period as Karak. It is perched on the side of a mountain, with a grand sweep of fruit trees below. The castle's exterior is impressive, with a foreboding gate and encircling triple wall. Despite the precautions of its builder, the fortress fell to Saladin only 75 years after it was raised. Inscriptions by his proud successors appear on the castle wall.

Umm Qays

In addition to Jerash and Amman, Gadara (now Umm Qays) and Pella (Tabaqit Fahl) were once Decapolis cities, and each has unique appeal. Perched on a splendid hilltop overlooking the Jordan Valley and the Sea of Galilee, Umm Qays boasts impressive ancient remains, such as the stunning black basalt theatre, the basilica and adjacent courtyard strewn with nicely carved black sarcophagi, the colonnaded main street and a side street lined with shops, an underground mausoleum, two baths, a nymphaeum, a city gate and the faint outlines of what was a massive hippodrome.

Pella (Tabqit Fahl)

Pella is exceptionally rich in antiquities, some of which are exceedingly old. Besides the excavated ruins from the Graeco-Roman period, Pella offers visitors the opportunity to see the remains of Chalcolithic settlement from the 4th millennium BC, evidence of Bronze and Iron Age walled cities, Byzantine churches, early Islamic residential quarters and a small medieval mosque.

Umm Al-Jimal

The eastern most of the major northern cities, Umm Al-Jimal is located at the edge of the eastern basalt desert plain, along a secondary road that was close to the junction of several ancient trade routes that linked central Jordan with Syria and Iraq. Among the most interesting structures to visit are the tall barracks with their little chapel, several large churches, numerous open and roofed water cisterns, the outlines of a Roman fort, and the remains of several town gates.

Umm Ar-Rasas

Excavations in Umm Ar-Rasas have uncovered some of the finest Byzantine church mosaics, including a large carpet depicting Old and New Testament cities on both the east and west banks of the Jordan River. Another feature at Umm Ar-Rasas walled settlement is a 15m Byzantine tower used by early Christian monks seeking solitude. Umm Ar-Rasas is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Iraq Al-Amir

Iraq Al-Amir is within the municipality of Amman in the Jordan Valley. Located about 15km southwest of the town of Wadi Al-Seer, it has a population of about 6,000 people. Located on the hills, the area has many springs and is famous for its olive trees, in addition to other forest trees. About 0.5km south of the town is the historical site of Al-Iraq. It was built by a Persian prince in the 3rd century BC. There are many caves in the hills that date back to the Copper Age.

Some precious artifacts, pottery, glass and weapons dating back to the Bronze Age and the Nabataen and Roman periods, as well as inscriptions, gold Islamic coins and the silver Ptolemaic hoard recently discovered at Iraq Al-Amir are displayed at the Exhibition of Arab Heritage and Recent Discoveries, which was opened in 1992.

The Kings' Highway

The Kings' Highway winds its way through the different ecological zones of the country, including forested highlands, open farmland plateaus, deep ravines, the edge of the Eastern Desert, and the warm tropical Gulf of Aqaba. Lining both sides of this 335km (207 mile) thoroughfare is a rich chain of archaeological sites that reads like an index of ancient history and a biblical gazetteer -- prehistoric villages from the Stone Age, biblical towns from the kingdoms of Ammon, Moab and Edom, Crusader Castles, some of the finest early Christian Byzantine mosaics in the Middle East, a Roman-Herodian fortress, several Nabataean temples, two major Roman fortresses, early Islamic towns, and the rock-cut Nabataean capital of Petra. First mentioned by name in the Bible, the Kings' Highway was the route that Moses wished to follow as he led his people north through the land of Edom, which today is in southern Jordan. The name may, however, derive from the even earlier episode recounted in Genesis 14, when an alliance of "four kings from the north" marched their troops along this route to do battle against the five kings of the Cities of the Plain, including the wicked cities of Sodom and Gomorrah.

Restaurants

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Amman

Amman is a large cosmopolitan city and as such offers an extensive range of restaurants serving all popular international cuisines; just about everything from Italian to Mongolian. Visitors should be sure to try the local food and there are a lot of good traditional restaurants to choose from, many of which also provide live entertainment.

Coffee shops, both traditional and modern, are popular meeting places, and seem to appear on almost every street. Also, because the Jordanian people are particularly fond of sweet things, there are many excellent patisseries. Several international fast food chains are represented in Amman.

The Dead Sea

The Dead Sea resorts all have several excellent restaurants which serve a wide variety of international and traditional cuisines. Many also provide live entertainment.

Karak

A number of local restaurants can be found, ranging from traditional local fare to international dishes. Most can be found near the castle or near the statue of Saladin in the new town.

Petra

Within Wadi Musa are several restaurants serving traditional cuisine. For a truly memorable night out there is the Petra Kitchen where, under the watchful eyes of local chefs, you and your fellow diners can prepare your own traditional Arabic meal.

Aqaba

As can be expected from a seaside resort, fresh fish is exceptionally good in Aqaba and there are several seafood restaurants within the town. Apart from the places offering excellent Arabic dishes, there are international restaurants serving a variety of cuisine from around the world.

All the main hotels have independent restaurants and cafes, which serve a good selection of international and local cuisine.

Jerash

A number of local restaurants and eateries can be found offering mostly local fare. Prices vary, but servings are typically plentiful.

Ajloun

A number of restaurants offering a variety of local fare can be found in the region of the castle.

Madaba

Apart from the restaurants within Madaba's hotels, there are several traditional restaurants within the town, serving Arabic food.

Shopping

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Wherever you go in Jordan you will find plenty of opportunities to shop. For visitors there is a wide range of locally made handicrafts and other goods available at all the popular sites, as well as within the boutiques of the leading hotels and at the various visitors' centers. There you will find hand-woven rugs and cushions, beautifully embroidered items and clothing, traditional pottery, glassware, silver jewelry embedded with semi-precious stones, Bedouin knives, coffee pots, narghiles (hubble bubble), marquetry work, antiques and other artifacts. The list is endless and about as varied as you can imagine.

Take time to visit the souks in Jordan’s larger towns and cities. These are treasure troves for those seeking something a little bit out of the ordinary. Within the souks are also excellent gold and silver outlets, where some great bargains can be found. Also worth visiting are the busy market shops, especially for exotic spices, herbs and seasonings.

Both Amman and Aqaba offer sophisticated shops and boutiques selling the very latest fashions in jewelry, clothing, accessories, leather and electronic goods.

When in Amman, don’t forget to visit Al-Wakalat Street to find all European and North American brand stores lining the streets and offering their latest collections, as well as in the many malls available throughout the city. Also, Rainbow Street is a great tourist area, where many handicraft stores, coffee shops, and lounges overlook the paved lanes.

Almost everywhere in Jordan you can find the world-famous Dead Sea spa products. All are of excellent quality and produced under strict clinical conditions. They are also very reasonably priced.

In all cases, the shopkeepers are helpful and friendly. Most speak at least a little English but even if they don’t, there is usually someone around who will only be very willing to assist you.

Sports

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Jordan’s modern hotels and resorts are all equipped with spas, fitness centers, swimming pools, and tennis courts. In and around Amman, it is easy to find facilities for track and field sports, horseback riding, cycling, hiking, and gliding, golf and it is possible to go to the impressive Sports City to watch professional football, basketball, handball, and other sports.

Aqaba

In the south, the seaside resort of Aqaba provides the perfect location for rest and relaxation on the shores of the Red Sea. In addition, it offers first-class scuba diving and snorkeling with some of the most beautiful and best preserved coral reef in the world. The visitor can also participate in swimming, sailing, windsurfing, waterskiing, or enjoy views of the active marine life on a ride in a glass-bottomed boat. Aqaba is renowned for its warm water and sunny weather and is a delightful destination that can be enjoyed all year round. The five and four star hotels in Aqaba offer world class spa facilities.

Wadi Rum

A quick trip from Aqaba, Wadi Rum offers a truly unique and adventurous experience. The visitors will be amazed by their surroundings amid the stupendous cliffs, canyons, and seemingly endless orange sands as they enter the desert on a camel, horse, or 4x4 jeeps driven by a local Bedouin. It is then up to them to explore and discover the secrets of Wadi Rum hiking through the sand and mountains. Rock climbing is a popular activity and visitors come from around the world to tackle Wadi Rum’s challenging climbs. Many have described these routes as comparable to those found in the Dolomites.

While it is an easy day-trip from Aqaba or Petra, Wadi Rum is best experienced during a night or two of camping under the stars enjoying the silence of the desert far away from the stresses of everyday life.

What kind of vacation would you like to take?